Bad Roofing

The above photos are from a 1 month old roof install, October 2015. This is what the average homeowner does not know about. Yet we see homeowners continue to accept “REFERRALS” from friends who had their roof done by “so and so.” From the ground, this roof looked okay, yet when a professional does a detailed inspection, we see all the corners cut. This roof was totally torn off and redone by us. We are working with the homeowner to go after the contractor who completed the roof initially.

We are asked all of the time why we do not install certain brand products. We research our Customer Durability, Service & Reliability. We do not buy products based on price or marketing gimmicks. Just because a company states that they are the best, we do not believe them. We spend hundreds of hours researching and trying out new and old brand products to assure OUR customers get “ONLY THE BEST.”


Here is a PERFECT EXAMPLE of why we do not prefer to use “GAF” products. Once again, a press release on a Class Action lawsuit is filed against them. This is not the first time this has happened.

GAF Timberline Shingles Named in Two New Class Action Lawsuits

Date Published: Tuesday, August 30th, 2011

GAF Materials Corporation was named in two class action lawsuits earlier this summer alleging that its Timberline Shingles are defective. The GAF Timberline Shingle lawsuits were filed in Pennsylvania and Virginia on behalf of anyone who owns or owned a structure in the U.S. with Timberline Shingles manufactured after December 31, 1997.

GAF Timberline Shingles are asphalt shingles with a fiberglass base that were marketed as 30-40 year shingles. But according to the GAF Timberline Shingle Class Action lawsuits, the shingles crack prematurely, and fail to meet American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards for fiberglass shingles. The lawsuits further allege that GAF management personnel concealed this, and failed to inform consumers, contractors and homeowners that the Timberline Shingles did not meet ASTM standards, and would degrade and crack prematurely. Finally, the lawsuits contend that any structure that contains these shingles manufactured after December 31, 1997 needs to be re-roofed.

According to both lawsuits, GAF was receiving complaints regarding premature cracking associated with its shingles, including Timberline shingles, by the late 1990s. From 2001 – 2002, GAF fiberglass shingle cracking claims increased 43 percent. It was internally noted by GAF that the shingles made at one of its plants was its “fastest growing problem.

Timberline Shingles are manufactured at several plant locations across the country, and each uses a different process to manufacture these products. According to the lawsuits, GAF’s own investigation concluded that the problems with the shingles stemmed from raw materials. Plants in Minneapolis, Minnesota; Baltimore, Maryland; Millis, Massachusetts; and Fontana, California, had manufactured shingles with these defective raw materials. Additional investigation found that manufacturing plants in Mobile, Alabama and Dallas, Texas also had the same problems.

Despite changing its specifications for raw materials, GAF never informed consumers about the problems with the shingles about their defects, or issued a recall of the Timberline Shingles, the lawsuits claim.

Both GAF Timberline Shingle lawsuits seek compensation for damages suffered by the plaintiffs and class members, as well as attorneys fees. The lawsuits also ask that GAF be required to initiate a post-sale instruction and warning campaign, to conduct further testing, and to refrain from making unlawful representations about warranty claims.

These are just the latest class action lawsuits to allege GAF Timberline Shingles are defective. Similar lawsuits have been filed in other states, including Alabama and South Carolina.
NewsInferno.com disclaimer: This article: GAF Timberline Shingles Named in Two New Class Action Lawsuits was posted on Tuesday, August 30th, 2011 at 8:25 am at NewsInferno.com and is filed under GAF Shingles, Legal News.

They re-used the old flashing, see how it is open now which will allow wind driven rain to enter into the home.

 

When installing a Modern Roof Systems, you are suppose to use the proper starter strips manufactured by the company to provide proper sealing at the roof’s edge.

 

The red line is the Nail Line. These Installers clearly didnt know what they are doing.